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Unit 5 Health and Social Care

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Aim of Unit 5 Working in Partnership in Health and Social Care

Group dynamics is an important factor in any organization and an impact is high enough in Health and social care organization. An organization can perform excellently if employees work in partnership. The concept of power-sharing is important in this regards. The overall partnership a strategy has been addressed in three different grounds. Thus, promotion in the autonomy has been addressed. These three levels are contained with an examination of partnership level; partnership in different level has been also addressed in this part. The final stage of the whole process is the identification of different working strategies. The methods for addressing positive partnership are also addressed in this unit. 

Unit 5 Health and social care
Unit 5 Health and social care
Unit 5: Working in Partnership in Health and Social Care

Learning outcomes

1. Understand partnership philosophies and relationships in health and social care services

2. Understand how to promote positive partnership working with users of services, professionals and organisations in health and social care services

3. be able to evaluate the outcomes of partnership working for users of services, professionals and organisations in health and social care services.

LO1 Understand partnership philosophies and relationships in health and social care services

An excellent partnership could be established in the organization if the partnership philosophies are addressed properly. The partnership philosophies which have been addressed in this unit are empowerment theories; autonomy and respect, the way of power-sharing, and making informed choices. An excellent partnership relationship could be established if the learners get to know how to respect others. It is not an easy task to deal with mental patients. In order to get a clear idea regarding this, the areas which have been addressed are a statutory, voluntary, community forum, private, independent and charitable. 

LO2 Understand how to promote positive partnership working with users of services, professionals and organisations in health and social care services

A positive performing environment could be created if there is an effective collaboration with the theories. The professional roles and activities in this regards are also addressed in this study. It has been addressed in such a manner that inter-disciplinary and inter-agency working environment could be projected clearly. An important example of this concept is Multi-Area Agreements (MAA) and Local Area Agreements (LAA). Legislation and partnership rules are required to be evaluated clearly that learners are able to understand this. One of the important parts of this is safeguarding children and proper legislation has to be followed in this regards. Organizational practices and policies are also addressed in this regards. The role of voluntary agencies has been addressed along with risk assessment criteria. 

LO3 Be able to evaluate the outcomes of partnership working for users of services, professionals and organisations in health and social care services

This part of the unit helps to evaluate outcome from which has been generated from the service. Learners are able to learn about decision-making criteria. Mitigation of duplication in service has also addressed in this part. Important professional outcomes have been addresses that learners are able to understand what activities are required to be done. The strategies to mitigate the outcome have been also addressed in this part of the unit.

Learning outcomes and assessment criteria

Learning outcomes On successful completion of this unit a learner will: Assessment criteria for pass The learner can:
LO1 Understand partnership philosophies and relationships in health and social care services 1.1 explain the philosophy of working in partnership in health and social care 1.2 evaluate partnership relationships within health and social care services
LO2 Understand how to promote positive partnership working with users of services, professionals and organisations in health and social care services 2.1 analyze models of partnership working across the health and social care sector 2.2 review current legislation and organisational practices and policies for partnership working in health and social care 2.3 explain how differences in working practices and policies affect collaborative working
LO3 Be able to evaluate the outcomes of partnership working for users of services, professionals and organisations in health and social care services. 3.1 evaluate possible outcomes of partnership working for users of services, professionals and organisations 3.2 analyze the potential barriers to partnership working in health and social care services 3.3 devise strategies to improve outcomes for partnership working in health and social care services.

Links

This unit has links with, for example:

This unit also has links with the National Occupational Standards in Health and Social Care. See

Sample for Unit 5 Health and social care

Report in Partnership in Health and Social Care

Contents

Introduction. 3

Task 1. 4

1.1 Explain the philosophy of working in partnership in health and social care. 4

1.2 Evaluate partnership relationships within health and social care services. 5

Task 2. 6

2.1 Analyse models of partnership working across the health and social care sector 6

2.2 review current legislation and organisational practices and policies for partnership working in health and social care practice. 7

2.3 Explain how differences in working practices and policies affect collaborative working. 8

Task 3. 9

3.1 evaluate possible outcomes of partnership working for users of services, professionals and organisations. 9

3.2 analyse the potential barriers to partnership working in health and social care service. 10

3.3 devise strategies to improve outcomes for partnership working in health and social care services. 10

Conclusion. 11

References. 11

Introduction

Nowadays, partnership mode of business organisation is gaining wide popularity in each and every sector. The social and health care sector is also adopting partnership working since past few decades. It has been observed that by working in partnership in health and social care, the twin services of health care and service care organisations are provided which adds to the advantage of care setting. In general terms, partnership working in health and social care setting is the collaboration between two or more organisations which provide medical as well as social care facilities (Torchia, Calabro and Morner 2015). The below discussion explains the importance of working in partnership working in health and social care setting by analysing the case scenario provided. The case talks about the St. Martins hospital which caters to the need of older people.

1. Task 1

1.1 Explain the philosophy of working in partnership in health and social care

According to the Partnership Act, partnership refers to a form of business organisation in which two or more people or organisations combine togethertheir skills, resources in order to provide better products and services. Association of Business Organisations state that a partnership consists of a relationship of two or more individuals and organisations on the basis of a contract made in accordance with both the parties (Glasby 2017). According to the Summit of Partnership, partnership is a formal agreement between partners to contribute and share profit to accomplish a common goal. Due to the dynamic business environment in the health and social care sector, it has been identified that many care settings have embraced partnership (Glasby and Dickinson 2014).

In the context of care settings, partnership involves combination of the heath care organisations and social care organisations which provide combined services to the users at one place. It is seen that partnership is characterised by different perspectivesin health and social care setting. According to collaborative working perspective, separate professionals and agencies in the care setting are collaborated along with the service users to empower them. With respect to inter-personal working, partnership is defined as the working of professionals from different disciplines (Cameron et. al. 2014). Under this partnership, same service user is involved.

There are six philosophical principles of working in partnership in health and social care sector. The first among them is empowerment which states that freedom is provided to each and every person involved in the care setting including patients as well as service providers. For instance, the patient must have the empowerment in regards to the choice of food that he must be provided. Likewise, the professionals are empowered to take decisions regarding the use of their skills and knowledge in order to continue the treatments. Also, the organisation has the empowerment to make policies and practices (Glasby 2017). The second principle independence states that independence is provided to each person with regards to the choices that best suits them. The service users cannot be dealt with force or coercion as they have the independence, professionals are independent to carry out their procedures and the care organisations are independent in adopting the leadership and management styles.  Respect is another principle which states that care provider as well as the care user is respected in a care setting. For instance, old age people who are the service users in the care setting need to be given special attention and should be respected. Service professionals who are providing the services need to be addressed with respect and no harm is provided to the reputation and respect of the organisation by misconduct.  Making informed choices is the fourth principle which states that all the decisions taken within a care setting need to be informed to all those who are affected by it (Dickinson and O’Flynn 2016). For instance, doctor who is the professional need to inform the change in the dosage of patients who is the service user to the care provider of the patient. Also, the organisation needs to have the whole information about what is happening in the organisation. The fifth principle which is power sharing describes that power need to be shared among different care organisations who have collaborated to work in partnerships. All the service users, professionals as well as the care organisation need to share power amongst them when working in partnerships. The last, autonomous principle provides self-government authority to the care organisations. For instance, the health organisation has the right to take decisions of the food and the medication provided to the patients, irrespective of the social care organisation. The service users, professionals and the care organisations are provided with self government authority in which service users has the right to ask for their rights, professionals have the right to conduct activities and the organisation has the right to follow management, employment as well as organisational practices.

1.2 Evaluate partnership relationships within health and social care services.

Partnership relationships refer to the relationship shared among different organisations working together to serve to the needs of the users and the patients. There are different types of partnerships. The first among them is strategic partnerships in which local authorities and health service providers join together (Carpenter et. al. 2017). The other one is collaborative working in which agencies and care professionals work together by involving service users and providing them empowerment. For instance, a private sector and NHS (National Health and Safety) collaborated to work together in an Australian Care Centre. The third partnership relationship is in the form of inter-agency working in which social care organisations, health care organisations as well as housing organisations collaborate for the common objectives. Inter-professional working is another type of partnership relationship in which professionals from different disciplines are involved with the same user. The main goals of partnership relationships are early intervention in the care setting, meeting the actual needs of the service users, enhanced service quality and delivery and seamless services. Considering the first aim of early intervention, it is seen that partnership helps in intervening in the organisational activities. Also, the major aim of the care setting is to work for the betterment of the society and thus provide effective and quality services which are seamless. The service users avail the service of the care setting in order to meet their increasing medical and social needs which formulate the main aim.

When it comes to care, partnership relationships are created with a view to improve service user outcomes. Different partnership agencies work in collaboration with each other to meet the objectives of the partnership which are supporting early intervention, meeting the actual needs of the clients, providing a cost effective care system and supporting prevention. The partnership agencies need to work according to stipulated conditions so as to create a positive impact on the service users (Brett et. al. 2014). Partnership relationships of health care and social setting involve service users, elderly and young people and people with mental health issues. With regards to services users, it is seen that the needs of the service users is put first in health and social care setting which states that good partnership relationships prevail amongst the care organisations. It is seen that service users have varied needs at the same time which is very helpful in assessing the effectiveness of the care organisation. For instance, if the collaboration is not working effectively, then the service users are negatively impacted.

The partnership relationships with mental health issues are to improve mental health outcomes. It is seen that different professionals from different agencies provide the assessment of the mental capacity of the individuals before the decision is taken. With regards to elderly people, it is seen that relationships are characterised by various agencies involved such as primary care trusts, local partners and local hospitals which aim to provide quality services to treat their illnesses. It is evaluated that partnership relationships help in addressing the growing medical and social needs of the elderly. Apart from that, young people in the care learn about the care settings and their importance in treating the disease.

These partnership relationships create an impact on elderly and young people involved in the care, service users as well as the professionals. With respect to service users, integrated services are provided which caters to their collective needs of the care setting. Also, the quality of the services delivered to them is enhanced which increases their satisfaction (Balloch and Taylor 2014). However, working in partnership involves complexities which in turn result into chaos and confusion, further leading to ineffective services. Also, it is seen that it results into extreme completion between different partnership agencies within the health and social care setting. Considering the elderly and the young people, it is seen that partnership relationships have helped in providing them the services under one roof. The care professionals get to share the resources and knowledge with each other but sometimes end up having arguments with each other. People with mental health issues are benefitted by partnerships as they get the mental medication as well as other care.

With respect to partnership relationships, it is seen that there are different professional groups involved in health and social care setting. The major among them are health and social care workers, social workers, charitable forums, educationalists and voluntary sectors. Social workers work in collaboration with these organisations to address various social issues prevailing in the care setting. The care workers of the organisation spend ample amount of time in the care setting in order to provide effective services to the clients. It has been observed that various charitable forums are collaborated with the care settings to provide them with funds and resources from big business tycoons. Apart from that, several educationalists also share business relationships with these care settings with a view to promote education. Voluntary sectors also contribute to the working in health and social care organisations as they work for the betterment of society just like not-for profit organisations.  

M1- This criterion is achieved by assessing the impact of partnership relationships within the health and social care provision. Both the positive and negative aspects are discussed for a clear understanding of the impact created by partnership relationships within the health care. In the above discussion the pros and cons involved in the form of improvement of health care services, improvement in the quality and effective meeting of principle of support are met. In addition to this the drawbacks discussed are in the form of detailed procedures involved, delays in the activities are discussed in the above section.

D1- By discussing the philosophies of working in partnership in health and social care sector in the above section, I have been able to understand the significance of the partnership philosophies which govern the health and social care sector. The principles such as empowerment, independence, making informed choices, autonomy, power sharing and respect constitute to be the philosophies of partnership which provides the basic guidelines about what is expected out of a care setting. I have learnt that a partnership cannot be successful in a health care setting if these philosophies are not taken into consideration. I have spent a lot of time and efforts in identifying these philosophies and applying their importance in the health and care setting in the practical world. However, it has been observed that my understanding regarding the theoretical perspectives of autonomy and independence are mixed as I was not able to clearly differentiate the concept of both these philosophies.

I have understood that philosophy of partnership working requires efforts from various parties involved and this philosophy helps in enhancing the overall quality of services. However, at the same time, I have observed that this philosophy is difficult to be applied in practical aspects due to the dynamism being present in the health and social care environment.

2. Task 2

2.1 Analyse models of partnership working across the health and social care sector

In general terms, model refers to a representation of the proposed structure and system. Partnership models refer to the structure in which partnership is formulated within an organisation. In the context of health and social care setting, partnership models are divided into two categories-formal and informal. Formal partnerships are those which follow a definite structure in its working and communication whereas informal partnerships are those in which there is no written record of the partnership as is the case in formal partnerships (Glasby and Dickinson 2014). In informal partnerships, partnership working is carried out through informal means. It is seen that St. Martins followed a unified and problem oriented model.

Co-ordinated model is a type of formal model in which care providers work from different locations but follow formal structure. For instance, ABC care setting in Japan follows co-ordinated model in which health care and social care organisations work independently by following formal structure.

Advantages-

  • It is popular model used in real life business situations.
  • It is an effective model which facilitates collaborative working.

Disadvantages

  • It creates a lot of confusion and chaos in working collaboratively with the help of this model.
  • It is time consuming.

Coalition model is another type which contradicts the co-ordinated model as it is characterised by the aligning of separate units. For instance, Carewell organisation in Japan follows coalition model in which all the units like mental care, health care and social care work collectively in a single incorporated system (Leathard 2012).

Advantages

  • It involves separate units as a result of which it facilitates specialisation, in the care setting.
  • It a widely used model.

Disadvantages

  • It is a complex method as different care units are involved in its functioning.

Unified model integrates the management of the services by involving different partnership agencies who work for promoting the health and social well-being of the users. For instance, in Belgium, it is seen that unified models consisting of local primary care centres as well as day care homes function in the care setting (Glasby and Dickinson 2014).

Advantages

  • It promotes unity among different agencies which in turn results into better quality of the services provided.

Disadvantages

  • As mentioned above, the model consists of different agencies which are the major cause of conflict of interests.

Hybrid model is the one which consists of the characteristics of different models. It consists of the characteristics of both the coalition and co-ordinated models. For instance, in China there are a number of social, public and private sector partnerships which all consist of hybrid models (Glasby and Dickinson 2014).

Advantages

  • It consists of the benefits of all the models.

Disadvantages

  • It is difficult to use.

Problem-oriented model states that partnership is created in order to solve a problem. For instance, a health care organisation and social care organisation in the UK is created with the motive of solving the problem of increasing dementia among elder people of the UK.

Advantages-

  • It provides clearly defined objectives
  • Effective identification of problems.

Disadvantages

  • It becomes it too difficult to manage the activities because of the complex structure involved.

Multi-agency model refers to the partnership model in which a number of agencies are involved in providing special care to the users.

Advantages

  • It involves a number of agencies that provide effective services.

Disadvantages

  • It is too expensive to use.

Joint working model is the one in which both care organisations collaborate with each other. It is an important model type especially in care setting where both health and social care organisations join together to provide quality services to the users (Glasby and Dickinson 2014).

Advantages

  • Effective service provision through this model.

Disadvantages

  • It creates chaos and confusion

Ideological model refers to the formulation of the structure of the care settings in accordance with various ideologies (Torchia, Calabro and Morner 2015).

Advantages

  • It is cost effective.
  • It is easy to use.

2.2 Review current legislation and organisational practices and policies for partnership working in health and social care practice

The organisational practices and legislations are vital for health and social care organisations as they provide the guideline and framework within which the organisations have to work. They provide certain rules and regulations which help these organisations to provide effective services to the clients. The legislations that are applied to care settings are the Care Standard Act 2000, NHS Act, Mental Health Act 1983, the Health and Social Care Act 2012, and Children’s Act 2004 (Bernal et.al. 2017).

The Care Standards Act 2000 provides a regulatory framework for inspecting the activities of care settings in the UK. It caters to the needs of hospitals, day care centres, boarding schools as well as nursing homes. It affects partnership working as it is a mandatory standard to be adhered to. According to the NHS Act, Section 75-partnerships all the care organisations include health bodies such as NHS trusts and foundation trusts. This act helps the care organisations to deliver quality services without worrying about the organisational boundaries. Wellbeing of children in the care setting is promoted by developing Young People’s Plan under the Children’s Act 2004 (Smith, Cowie and Blades 2015). The Health and Social Care Act 2012 aims to provide accountability to the patient and also provide freedom to the care organisations to take steps to improve the quality of the care services. Likewise, the Mental Health Care Act promotes mental well-being of the patients and clients of a particular care setting.

Organisational Practices and Policies (OPAP) in a care setting are in the form of agency practices, policy documents and employment practices. For instance, regional and national policy documents are to be submitted by the care organisation in order to maintain trust among the service users as well as their families (Kuluski et. al. 2017). Apart from that, service planning procedures in the form of agreements between NHS trusts, social care organisations and hospitals also constitute to be an important part while working in partnerships in care setting. To provide an illustration of the organisational practices and policies in care setting, it is seen that National Service Frame Works is applied to care settings. On the basis of this framework, these organisations are given the authority to provide social services to the clients.

The best example of the importance of the organisational practices and legislations in the care setting is given in the case of the death of Baby P. The case explains about the death of a 17 month old baby who died because of various injuries and bruises caused by his mother. A medical examination was conductedand it was found out that the child died because of abuse (Smith, Cowie and Blades 2015). A legal notice was sent to the mother which indicated that the care proceedings of the Haringey Council’s Children and Young People’s Service were not met. Thus, it is seen that legislations play a crucial role in care settings.

The Death of baby P case was an eye opener for all the organisations as well as the parents and guardians to follow all the rules and regulation with respect to child care. It is evident from the case scenario of Baby P that strict action can be taken from government and child authorities in case proper health and safe environment is not provided to the children.

The NMC code of practice also give support to partnership working. For example it suggest that “all nurses must act first and foremost to care for and safeguard the public. They must practise autonomously and be responsible and accountable for safe, compassionate, person-centred, evidence-based nursing that respects and maintains dignity and human rights. They must show professionalism and integrity and work within recognised professional, ethical and legal frameworks. They must work in partnership with other health and social care professionals and agencies, service users, their carers and families in all settings, including the community, ensuring that decisions about care are shared” (NMC, 2010).

The Health and Social Care Act 2012 can be identified as one of the main acts that has shaped and controlled the partnership working in the health and social care industry. The health and social care act of 2012 established several agencies/ boards that have taken the responsibilities of partnership working. Those are the clinical commissioning group (CQC), the economic regulations in the   health care systems, health and well – being boards. These organisations promote partnerships in the health care industry and help to maintain the quality of the services offered by the partnership organisation (Legislations website, 2015). The CQC established by the act audits all the health care trusts and partnership organisations in terms or service quality, infection rates, mistakes and service effectiveness.                                                          Care Standards Act 2000 is another act that has established standards for working in service provisioning in the health and social care industry. Before the introduction of the act, the Healthcare commission, the commission for social care inspections, and the mental health commission were the organisations that maintained the service quality (Legislations website, 2015). But the Care Standards act got all those organisations in to a partnership and established the Care Quality Commission which has been auditing and maintaining the quality of service in health care.                                  Mental Capacity Act 2005: the basic aim of the act is to empower those people who are not able to make the plan or take the decision for them and also make the plan on behalf of them to raise the standard of their life. According to this act, everybody has a right to take the decision on their life to stay happy. Same thing applied on the patients, who are admitted in the mental hospitals. The professional agencies such as mental health services, local authorities, social services, police and the family members all need to assess the mental capacity of the individual before the decision making of the other party that affects the life of the individual. All associated agencies need to work properly who affect the service user to raise the standard of service user’s life.

RISK ASSESSMENT AND CARE PLANNING- Under this provision, risk is assessed in the care setting with regards to health risks, financial risks, safety risks and many more. Care planning involves the planning of the care services that are to be provided to the service users.

EMPLOYMENT PRACTICES: DBS

The Disclosure and Barring Certificate provides the guidelines to the employers to maintain safe employment practices within the care setting with special references to recruitment decisions.

SAFEGUARDING CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE

Under this provision, special attention is paid to provide safety to children and young people.

RECORD KEEPING/ RECORD REPORTING

All the records maintained in the health and social care organisations are maintained electronically.

NO SECRETS

All the members involved in the care setting need to adhere to the policy of no secrets, wherein no secrets exist between service users, professionals and the care organisations.

WHISTLE BLOWING/ADVOCACY

Whistle blowing policy helps the employees to report any misconduct, error or fraud taking place in the organisation. The motive to is to provide protection to those employees who raise their voices against any wrongdoing.

NO SECRET DOCUMENT

No secret document is provided in the care setting

All the above rules are considered important in partnership working as they are necessary in their day-to-day functioning in which different partnership agencies are involved.

2.3 Explain how differences in working practices and policies affect collaborative working

Collaborative working is described as the sharing of knowledge, resources, work as the objectives to provide efficient services to the users between different teams in a particular organisation. According to SCIE, collaborative working is a type of methodology in which all the professionals involved evaluate the current position of the organisation, future goals and the strategies to achieve those goals (Savage and Ahluwalia 2016). As per the Regulatory Body of the Partnership, collaborative working refers to the activity which promotes joint working of two or more individuals or organisations. The third definition is derived from the Council of Partnership Relationships which state that working in collaboration not only means sharing resources and knowledge but also, means the act of having a shared vision and objectives to be achieved. There are differences in working policies and practices as all the organisations and the partnered professionals who are involved in the care setting adopt different practices which sometimes lead to ineffective communication, issues and conflicts. It is seen that type of organisation impacts the collaborative working. Some organisations are government organisations while some are third sector organisations.

The administration and working system in government and third sector organisations are different from each other which pave way for ineffectiveness in collaborative working. Both the organisations use different types of organisational styles which reflect different working often leading to ineffectiveness in collaborative working. For instance, if an organisation follows autocratic leadership style in which the medical treatments given to patients are decided by the top management irrespective of the views and opinions of the health care professionals who are more likely to provide better solutions, then it cannot collaboratively work with organisations having different leadership styles (Chege, Wachira and Mwenda 2015). Further with this, codes of practices also affect collaborative working in the care settings. For instance, the standards of health and safety in care settings might be different for health care and social care organisations which cause hindrance in the managing of work between partners (Bernal et.al. 2017). Also, different goals and focus are the factors which create differences in the health and social care settings. The health care organisations generally emphasize on the health and safety of the clients whereas, social foundations focus on social well being of an individual. This sometimes leads to conflict of interests between the health and social care professionals. For instance, if an elderly person is advised to undergo a painful surgery which is necessary to improve his health, conflicts may arise between the partners. The doctors would suggest operating the patient, whereas the care trusts would not want the patient to undergo such painful surgery at such old age. Thus, it is seen that the focus of the partners affect the collaborative working (Powell Davies et. al. 2016).

The policy documents used in these organisations are also different as different organisations are involved as a result of which chaos and confusion prevails. Further with this, it is seen that joint working agreements between care settings are characterised by too much information handling and chaos. To provide an illustration, joint working agreements with the day care organisation of older people and integrated children trust affects the collaborative working as the people catered to in both these organisations are different and therefore, there are many chances of the failure of partnership. Also, it is seen that risk assessment procedures of a child care and day care for old people are also different which makes it difficult for the care organisation to work collectively (Brett et. al. 2014).

Considering the partnership working to be an important decision in the care setting, positive partnership working amongst the care organisations needs to be promoted with service users, professionals and organisations. It can be promoted through practicing in a person-centered way which states that the decision with regards to the physical, mental and social well-being of an individual is to be centred around the person receiving the care. In other words, it means that he must be informed about the support service, medical treatment, cost involved, side-effects, food preferences and personal care and hygiene (van Tulder et. al. 2016). Apart from that, effective communication between service users, professionals as well as care setting would prove to be of great importance in promoting positive partnership. Communication is believed to be one of the most important assets that assure positive working in the organisation. Information relating to the service needs, medication changes and documents are to effectively communicate within the partnerships working in the health and social care sector.

Another way through which partnership working can be promoted is by way of feedbacks. Feedback of the clients as well as service professionals can help in gaining the knowledge relating to the service offered after collaborating the work and thus, provides a deeper insight of any occurrence of loopholes in the current working which can be addressed. Moreover, it helps in building the trust and confidence among all the people involved in the care setting (Means and Glasby 2017).

M2- This merit criterion has been attained by justifying the impact of differences in working practices and policies in the health and social care by way of certain examples and instances. The scenario has been effectively discussed by the provision of partnership examples among different partnership agencies whose collaborative working is affected by difference in the working policies and practices with regards to joint working agreements, leadership styles adopted and many more to simplify the process of understanding. As a result of difference in working practices the collaborative working has been affected in health and social care setting as effective division of work and specialisation is practiced which further helps in effective collaborative working. This in turn helps in improving the overall quality of health and social care services.

D2- Distinction 2 criterion has been effectively achieved by providing the ways through which positive partnership working is promoted with service users, professionals and care organisations. The ways like effective communication, feedbacks as well as person-centred way are discussed which are likely to provide better and positive working in partnerships in health and social care.  By attaining this criterion, I have also come across my ability to provide the suggestions and ways through which positive partnership prevails in the care organisation. In addition to this, positive partnership can be promoted within the health and social care setting by effectively maintaining the rights and dignity of each of the individual involved. In order to promote positive partnership I would make efforts to consider the values and beliefs of others and at the same time presenting my own values and ideas to others in an effective manner.

3. Task 3

3.1 evaluate possible outcomes of partnership working for users of services, professionals and organisations.

Partnership working in this particular care setting is likely to create a positive impact on its working, especially on service users, professionals as well as the care setting itself.

  • Service users– They are the ones who are likely to avail the maximum benefits out of the partnership working. They are provided with integrated services of both medical care and social careunder one roof. Also, quality services are provided to the clients which helps in building their trust and confidence in the care setting (Kuluski et. al. 2017). For instance, the old age people are provided with health and social well-being in one place and therefore, they need not go from place to place. However, there are certain negative aspects like client abuse and duplication of service provision.
  • Professionals– Professionals under the care setting enjoy the benefits of informed decision making. The decisions taken by both the organisations are informed to each other so as to foster effective communication. Nevertheless, it sometimes causes confusion and overload in the care settings (Balloch and Taylor 2014). Partnerships provide better access to technology and skills of each other that in turn lead to quality service delivery.
  • Organisation– Partnerships help the organisations to create autonomy and empowerment for each and every individual with respect to the choices made. For instance, the health care organisation provides autonomy to the health care professionals to provide the autonomy to provide medical treatment to the patients. On the other hand, it also leads to frustration and employee turnover (Carpenter et. al. 2017).

On the basis of the above mentioned negative outcomes of working in partnership, it is recommended to the care organisation to provide proper training and development opportunities to the employees along with proper communication channels to ensure effective communication prevailing in the care organisation to reduce conflicts.

3.2 analyse the potential barriers to partnership working in health and social care service

Partnership working in the health and social care is embraced by a number of barriers. Barrier is described as the restricting agent that results into ineffectiveness and inefficiency. While working in this hospital, barrier is realised in the form of lack of leadership and organisational practices. It has been identified that lack of leadership is the major problem in this particular care setting. It involves a number of organisational practices and procedures in the various medical treatments provided by the care organisation. Due to lack of leadership, each department performs independently without informing the other departments (Bloice and Burnett 2016).

 Moreover, due to lack of shared vision among different units working for the care of elderly people, it is seen that the organisation is not effective enough in providing quality services to the users, especially in elderly adults. Also, ineffective communication between the health care provider and the social care provider prevails in the organisation which has been the major barrier in the entire process. It is seen that communication is the most important factor that determines success in a care setting. Thus effective communication is required at all levels (Moss 2017). Apart from that, financial barriers in the form of providing funds to the care setting, cost involved in the installation of new technology for surgeries and incisions among elders pose a major barrier to the care setting. With regards to potential barriers, it is seen that health and social care setting is characterised by resistance to change. The employees of the organisation resist the change and therefore, there are chances that they might not want to join in collaborative working in health and social care (Powell Davies et. al. 2017). Also, there are several administrative and cultural implications involved in each type of the organisation which makes it difficult for the health as well as social care organisations to cope up with changes.

It is seen that lack of shared IT system for data collection also contributes to be a barrier in partnership working along with lack of role of clarity. If the professionals and service providers working in the care setting are not provided with proper role clarity it leads to ineffective partnership working.

3.3 devise strategies to improve outcomes for partnership working in health and social care services.

In order to improve the outcomes of partnership working in health and social care a number of strategies are devised which are mentioned below:

Informed Decision making system

First of all, there is an emerging need to reduce communication gaps prevailing in this organisation. Thus, it is advised to the care setting to adopt informed decision making system so as to promote negotiations which in turn lead to exchange of ideas, views as well as grievances from each and every individual. 

Provision of training sessions

Training sessions need to be introduced with regards to the communication practices followed and listening and speaking skills (Moss 2017).

Responsibility allocation according to qualifications

Apart from that, it is very important on the part of the care setting to provide quality services to its clients. This can be ensured by allocating the responsibilities of the care users in accordance with the profession and qualifications of the care providers.

Quick decision making

Quick decision making needs to be fostered by the care organisation. The staff members need to be provided with empowerment to take timely decisions to avoid any contingency in the care setting.

Appropriate leadership style

Participative leadership needs to prevail in the organisation. It is recommended to the managers of both the health and social care setting to adopt participative leadership style in which the main authority lies in the hands of top management but the opinions and views of employees and lower level management are taken into consideration as they are the ones who have to facilitate collaborative working in the care setting (Brett et. al. 2014).

M3- The main requirement of this criterion is to provide variety of source of information that has been used in the discussion. To achieve this criterion, it is seen that a number of sources of information has been used. Peer reviewed journal articles and academic articles have been referred to provide information relating to the subject matter. In addition to this various online books have been referred while working on the above section and for this proper referencing of the sources have been done. Apart from that in order to provide credit to the authors whose information have been used proper citations have been done

D3- While discussing various aspects of the work I have tried to make use of my innovative, lateral and creative skills. For instance while evaluating the partnership working with different individuals I have categorised all the individuals in different categories such as service users, professionals and organisations. In addition to this, for analysing the professional barriers involved in partnership working in health and social care I have used my creative skills of aligning the barriers to leadership and management aspects to make it more realistic. At last, I have devised the strategies for improving the partnership working by using managerial recommendations as a part of my innovative and lateral thinking. Thus, overall within this assignment discussion various creative aspects have been covered while doing the various learning outcome criteria. 

Conclusion

Through this discussion, it is concluded that working in partnership in health and social care involves a lot or organisational procedures, challenges, barriers as well as partnership models which needs to be considered in order to promote healthy and social well-being of the service users. It is analysed that partnership working in this sector is characterised by many positive as well as negative outcomes to service users, professionals and the organisation which provides the base for further analysing the effectiveness and ineffectiveness of partnership working in the health and social care sector. Apart from that, partnership and collaborative working from different perspectives are elucidated which has provided with different definitions. Also, the legislations and the organisational practices concerning the health and social care organisation are revealed. Thus, it is concluded that the care organisations should consider on improving the partnership working as it provides ample opportunities as well as benefits that prove beneficial to not only the service users but also to the organisation and services users.

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